In his article Community Mapping, Chris Perkins describes the goals of community mapping as a democratic form of mapping. It enables individuals to express their own perspectives on an area instead of relying on institutional maps. Through five case studies, he demonstrates the struggles in having a really democratic form of mapping:

  • initiatives organised by existing organisations (church, tourism office, pressure groups, etc.) lead to greater participation, but they have their own agendas
  • participants are likely to have contrasting views, resulting maps are compromises
  • maps that could serve as a starting point or ground layer, are often protected by intellectual property rights
Picture taken by foto.bulle.

Old Ordnance Survey map (photographed by foto.bulle).